Monday, June 10, 2013

Museum Cars - Then and Now

by Nancy DeWitt

It's been a busy week at the museum, so we thought we'd treat you to some flashbacks. Here are some before-and-after restoration photos of a few of our cars.

At right is our 1914 Moline-Knight Model MK-50 7-passenger touring car, after it was acquired by J. Parker Wickham of Mattituck, New York. That's Mr. Wickham at the wheel.

 

Mr. Wickham restored the Moline-Knight, but we had it repainted before shipping it to Alaska.






Our 1918 Biddle town car, after Henry Austin Clark recovered it in 1952 from a collapsed garage on Long Island in New York.



The Biddle after restoration by Allan Schmidt of Horseless Carriage Restoration.



Our 1904 Buckmobile, after Walt Meyer disinterred it from a barn in New York in 1937.








Previous owner Joe Whitney performed a meticulous restoration on the Buckmobile.











The 1898 Hay Motor Vehicle. It was discovered in a Connecticut barn in the 1940s, but we assume this photo was taken much later than that.

The Hay after an extensive restoration spanning several owners, including the Fountainhead Antique Auto Museum.








The 1921 Heine-Velox Victoria Sport Touring as it looked during Parker Wickham's and William Harrah's ownership.










The Heine-Velox after restoration by Allan Schmidt and Horseless Carriage Restoration. It is such a big and imposing car that we chose a dark paint for it. The light paint reminded us too much of a battleship!



Our 1933 Hupmobile Series K Victoria when it was purchased by Parker Wickman.



 After restoration by Mr. Wickham. Women expecially love this paint color!












And finally, our 1919 McFarlan Type 125 Type Sport Touring, as it looked while William Harrah and Parker Wickham owned it. Like with the Heine-Velox, we thought such a large car called for a darker paint job.  

Here's the McFarlan after Al Murray of Murray Motor Car restored it. First in Class winner at the 2012 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance and the 2012 Kirkland Concours d'Elegance!

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